If they consider that it’s all too awful for everyone they might sentence the person to “time served” which means they’re free to go.

War itself is extraordinary but there’s no reason why we can’t apply limits to violence even though we’re engaged in it. Giving the troops of any country carte blanche to do any horrible thing with no prospect of a war crimes hearing is ludicrous. There are reasons for the Geneva Conventions and there should be consequences, including penalties all the way up to imprisonment, for violating those bare minimum standards of decent conduct. The issue of correct treatment of prisoners isn’t exactly new.In a real sense, worrying about one injured prisoner when bombing raids and drone strikes kill civilians by the dozen is a bit hypocritical.None of which is to say I approve.

He and several other people – all officers, it was a camp designed to keep commanders away from other ranks – remonstrated with the American troops because of the way they were treating, read assaulting, the prison guards the best custom essays
. He never once discussed the war with us when we were growing up, but he opened up a bit to mum after we’d left home. Even with good training, PTSD is guaranteed for some % of combatants as well as physical injury for many of them.

Could you tell us what kind of things people discuss on your forum? My grandfather was a regular army officer, not just a wartime combatant. Related Discussions:responsebilityMars Colony a bad Idea?special special forcesPedophile book removedwhy did pope quit???Interesting Headline : Hagel stresses Israel’s right to strike Iranwar crimesWonder why Native Americans had no jailsWhy are women & children most targeted by social predators?So many bad news The war was finished. When you https://www.lbcc.edu/student-lms think about other mercy killing circumstances, there’s often no option but to convict. It is true that we’re asking them to risk death and injury on our behalf, but the real problem is that we’re telling them to kill and disable other people. Adelady, what do you think your father would have thought of the situation? Well, he fought in both desert and jungle – twice up Kokoda. When you look at some individual squads or sometimes whole armies where senior officers have allowed, or even ordered, mass rape of civilians and/or poisoning fields and water supplies and/or torture, starvation or murder of prisoners and refugees …

One of the best insights into war I can recall was a politician (who I really did not respect or admire in any other respect) pointing out that we focused on the wrong thing when talking about the sacrifice of soldiers. Can you provide a link to that please? During an Oct.

12 press conference in Kabul, U.S. If the judge decides that it was sort of justified but you have to deter similar offences, then they might impose a “reasonable” but not trivial sentence. These are full-time professional soldiers we’re talking about. Some people, when forced into such a situation, will suffer from cognitive dissonance(go crazy). Weapons training comes close, as when panic sets in, you switch to auto-pilot, and go with the training.But, when you are in the thick of it, the mind operates on a whole different level—Thoughts of love, law,and family and friends, or the joys of being a little boy are gone. had a quick peek at the headings you have in place for your forum – i have the feeling that it suffers from the same unfocusedness as many other wannabe forums not sure how to advise you on that, but usually successful forums are subject specific rather than social affairsjust my penny’s worth But Suggestion and feedbacks are always welcome. In my army(long ago and far away) disobeying a direct order had a sure consequence = Happy days in the rest home at fort Leavenworth, or, in country, at the LBJ(Long Binh Jail) which was rumored to be a hideous pitiless hell hole best avoided. But their initial reaction was that they were just unarmed/disarmed prisoners and there was no need to treat them as though it was trench warfare. Though I’d agree with you about post-combat treatment of veterans. The UK should also get this done.

The only comment I ever heard from him that might be relevant was about being liberated from his POW camp at the end of WW2. The troops on the other hand had heard about what other units had found at the death camps and they were inclined to take it out on any German troops they came across. Originally Posted by adelady When you hand a man a weapon, and put him in a situation where people are being shot and killed, and then demand “civilized behavior” you are creating a double bind psychological situation. trained in international law, … . We’re not talking about ignorant conscripts press-ganged into large scale wars with hardly any weapons training let alone any other preparation. We should not be surprised if that caused them problems. Originally Posted by cosmictraveler America has a signed agreement that states that no troops can be arrested or convicted of any war crimes. When you hand a man a weapon, and put him in a situation where people are being shot and killed, and then demand “civilized behavior” you are creating a double bind psychological situation. Not sure what he would say – he was a man of very few words. I’m pretty sure Australians are not alone in this.

Though I think we’d say that discovering those dreadful camps was about the worst thing anyone had come across at that time. Bush and Blair’s war crimes convictions seldom get a mention. If they consider that it’s all too awful for everyone they might sentence the person to “time served” which means they’re free to go. America has a signed agreement that states that no troops can be arrested or convicted of any war crimes. There is nothing “civilized” about war, and pretending otherwise is ludicrous.

Originally Posted by RedPanda Originally Posted by cosmictraveler America has a signed agreement that states that no troops can be arrested or convicted of any war crimes. They’re also trained to question doubtful orders, and. to. disobey. orders. they know are violations of those international treaties and conventions. … It is true that we’re asking them to risk death and injury on our behalf, but the real problem is that we’re telling them to kill and disable other people. There is no training that can prepare a person for combat. Can you provide a link to that please? Though his hatred for the French was unabated 50 years later. (He’d contracted polio when his battalion took over a filthy campsite previously occupied by the French Foreign Legion who were fighting on the other side for most of the war. And every other option you can think of. Secretary of State John Kerry said that under the pending U.S.-Afghan security agreement, the United States would retain exclusive jurisdiction over its service members for any crimes they commit in Afghanistan.https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=…8FAv_TQfF5cUaw But it wasn’t my ass on the line either. Thought I’d remedy that.

Some of that training involves role plays and tests which are designed to ward off that “psychological double bind”. None of us could possibly know what was in that soldiers mind at the moment he pulled the trigger. Don’t judge this fellow from the comfortable distance of your living room couch……………..Adelady, what do you think your father would have thought of the situation?…………. We should not be surprised if that caused them problems. He might not even have a good concept of it himself.If a crime was indeed committed, then it began long before the moment under question.How old was this soldier when the moment presented it’s self? How well was he trained?War is now and always has been a criminal act. Come on, join my site and help make difference.

All combat veterans should have free medical care including psychological care by trained practitioners who have also been in combat.When you hand a man a weapon, and put him in a situation where people are being shot and killed, and then demand “civilized behavior” you are creating a double bind psychological situation. Moved to section ‘Links’. They’re also trained to question doubtful orders, and. to. disobey. orders. they know are violations of those international treaties and conventions. Modern troops from countries in what is called the “free world” operate under something of a microscope these days.

Freedom of the press means freedom to question every battlefield decision.In world war 2, U.S. general George Patton stressed the importance of rapid forward movement over every other military virtue, and though he never said it directly in public everyone who worked for him understood that he disapproved of taking prisoners as prisoners bogged down the rapid movement of his armored columns. They maintained that these blokes weren’t so bad, they were just doing their job. Two of his mates who also contracted polio at the same time died from it.) He also loathed the Japanese, but not in the same visceral unrelenting way that a lot of ex-POWs did. Some of my fellows described the moment as a crystalline clarity of action and reaction(being wholly “in the moment”). Some of that training involves role plays and tests which are designed to ward off that “psychological double bind”. … My personal perspective is that if you do not like the way he behaved in combat, screw it, just take his weapon away, and send him home.

How many modern professional armies just “hand a man a weapon” and send him/her off to fight. afaik, Australian troops, not just officers, are trained in international law, Geneva Conventions and all that, as it affects them. I think the officers – a mixed bunch, Brits, Aussies, Canadians, Americans, probably some others – managed to calm them down a bit. The nitty gritty gets dealt with in the sentence.

One of the best insights into war I can recall was a politician (who I really did not respect or admire in any other respect) pointing out that we focused on the wrong thing when talking about the sacrifice of soldiers. recently a British soldier has been convicted of a war crime in Afghanistan.he shot and killed a severely injured enemy.he explained that they could not offer medical help to him and to call up a helicopter to pick him up would endanger the pilot and crew of that aircraft.do you think they were right to convict him or in the heat of the moment he was placed in a really desperate dilemma and made the right decision?I think in exceptional circumstances extraordinary decisions have to be made and I am glad I am not the one who has to make them. Originally Posted by marnixR had a quick peek at the headings you have in place for your forum – i have the feeling that it suffers from the same unfocusedness as many other wannabe forums not sure how to advise you on that, but usually successful forums are subject specific rather than social affairsjust my penny’s worth U said it right! When I was designing, i was not sure what my site should focus on. My sympathy is with the soldier, even though I do not know him…………………..edit: epimethius:What punishment did the conviction lead to?

Their inclination was to be decent if not generous.